List of wars involving Nigeria

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bitcoin miner erupter This is a list of wars and conflicts in Nigeria.

us army storyboard template Conflict
Combatant 1
Combatant 2
Results

The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera Congo Crisis
(1960–1964)
Congo
UNOC
 Katanga
 South Kasai
Victory

Katanga and South Kasai dissolved.

Nigerian Civil War
(1967–1970)
 Nigeria
 Egypt
 Biafra
Victory

Reincorporation of Biafra into Nigeria.

First Liberian Civil War
(1990–1997)
 Liberia
ULIMO
ECOMOG
NPFL
INPFL
Indecisive (ECOMOG mission successful)[1]

Elections held, Charles Taylor becomes President.

Sierra Leone Civil War
(1993–2002)
Sierra Leone
ECOMOG
 United Kingdom
UNAMSIL
RUF
NPFL
AFRC
Victory

Lomé Peace Accord
Defeat of the Revolutionary United Front.

Conflict in the Niger Delta
(2004–)
 Nigeria
MEND
NDPVF
NDLF
Ongoing

Amnesty agreement in 2009

Boko Haram insurgency
(2009–)
 Nigeria
 Cameroon
 Chad
 Niger
Boko Haram
Ansaru
Ongoing

Introduction of sharia law in 9 states.

Northern Mali War
(2013)
 Mali
 France
ECOWAS
Islamists
Withdrawal

Nigerian withdrawal due to insurgency at home.[2]

Invasion of the Gambia
(2017)
 Senegal
 Nigeria
 Ghana
 Mali
 Togo
Coalition 2016
 Gambia
MFDC
Victory

Yahya Jammeh steps down peacefully, minimal combat between the two sides.

See also[edit]

Insurgency in the Maghreb (2002–present)

References[edit]

^ “The Ecomog Experience with Peacekeeping in West Africa – Whither Peacekeeping in Africa? – Monograph No 36, 1999.” Accessed January 29, 2016.

Despite the often discouraging prospects, the ECOMOG operation was ultimately successful for several reasons. The first was the sheer political will and tenacity of ECOWAS. The organisation did not have the option of cutting and running, for reasons that were as much self-interested as humanitarian. The second was the ability to combine three phases of conflict resolution: peacekeeping, peacemaking, and peace enforcement, thereby changing mandates of forces in the field as developments on the ground required (a flexibility due, ironic