Toni Junnila

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Youth career

1996–2001
FC Jazz

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2002–2003
FC Jazz
45
(7)

2002
→ MuSa
1
(0)

2004–2005
Tampere United
33
(1)

2005
→ FC Hämeenlinna
13
(3)

2006–2008
FF Jaro
43
(7)

2008
→ JBK
4
(1)

2009–2011
FC PoPa
52
(4)

2012–
FC Jazz
53
(4)

National team‡

2003–2004
Finland U-21
5
(0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 31 March 2014.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 31 March 2014

Toni Junnila (born 31 December 1984[1]) is a Finnish footballer currently playing for FC Jazz in the Finnish second tier Ykkönen.[2]
Junnila has previously played 121 matches in the Finnish premier division Veikkausliiga for FC Jazz, Tampere United and FF Jaro.[1] He was a member of the Finland squad at the 2001 European U-16 Championship.
References[edit]

^ a b Junnila, Toni Veikkausliiga. Retrieved 31 March 2014.
^ Edustusjoukkue FC Jazz Official Homepage. Retrieved 31 March 2014.

This biographical article relating to Finnish football is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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일산오피

Osradio 104.8

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (December 2015)

osradio 104.8 is a non-commercial public radio station in Osnabrück, Germany which has been on air since 1 April 2002. It is the successor to the “Offenen Kanal Osnabrück” (Osnabrück Open Channel) which commenced operations on 18 October 1996 as one of 13 public radio projects. The broadcast licence, initially scheduled to last seven years, was extended through to 31 March 2014 in 2009; in spring 2013 it was further extended to 31 March 2021.
In accordance with state media law in Lower Saxony, the station has three key purposes: up-to-date reporting of local news, remaining easily accessibie to all people and conveying media literacy through seminars and training.

Contents

1 Reception
2 Programme

2.1 Youth radio
2.2 Student radio
2.3 “Radio der aktiven Generation” (Radio for the Active Generation)

3 Project work

3.1 Funkflöhe (“Radio Fleas”)
3.2 RAUM OS – Environmental Media Project

4 Links
5 References

Reception[edit]
The station’s broadcasting area covers the city of Osnabrück as well as the surrounding Landkreis (county), home to roughly 350,000 residents overall. The station can be received on the frequency of 104.8 MHz via antenna (97.65 MHz via cable); in addition a live stream and podcasts can be accessed online.
Programme[edit]
The station’s programme includes local news, reports, commentaries, interviews, tips and various other services, with topic areas such as politics, business, sport, culture, and university and school life. Particular focus is given to the station’s three “magazines”: “Startklar” (6-10 a.m.), “Regional” (10 a.m. – 4 p.m.) and “Impuls” (4-6 p.m.). On the weekends, programmes such as “Sport total” (2-6 p.m. on Saturdays) are broadcast.
Broadcast spaces are also given to the public by the editorial team as part of the station’s programme. Recurring topics and groups have become established parts of the programme within the framework of about 60 free broadcast spaces.
Youth radio[edit]
As part of the station’s commitment to media education, there is an independent editorial team named “Mikrowellen” aimed at pupils up to 15 years of age, which broadcasts its programme once a fortnight. Also appearing on air on a fortnightly basis is the group “Teen Spirit”, which allows
일산오피

Debatable Lands

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Map showing the location and eventual division of the Debatable Lands

The Debatable Lands, also known as debatable ground, batable ground or threip lands,[1] lay between Scotland and England. These lands were formerly in question to which it belonged, when they were distinct kingdoms. The name signifies the same thing as litigious or disputable ground.[2]

Contents

1 History
2 See also
3 Notes
4 References
5 Further reading
6 External links

History[edit]
The Debatable Lands extended from the Solway Firth near Carlisle to Langholm in Dumfries and Galloway, the largest population centre being Canonbie. The lands included the baronies of Kirkandrews, Bryntallone and Morton.[1] They were around ten miles (16 km) long from north to south and four miles (6 km) wide. The boundaries were marked by the rivers Liddel and Esk in the east and the River Sark in the west. For over three hundred years they were effectively controlled by local clans, such as the Armstrongs, who successfully resisted any attempt by the Scottish or English governments to impose their authority. In his history of the Border Reivers (The Steel Bonnets (1971)), George Macdonald Fraser says that the Armstrongs alone could put 3,000 men in the field. They launched frequent raids on farms and settlements outside the Debatable Lands, the profits enabling them to become major landowners. Other clans in the area were the Elwands, Ellwoods, or Elliots who extended into Teviotdale; the Nixons who were more numerous in Cumberland; the Crossars in Upper Liddesdale, with their chief stronghold in Riccarton/Riccarton Mill (Rickerton, forms of Richardtown) Northern/Upper Liddesdale (listed in valleys of Liddesdale as locus/locality of Croyser 1376) of Hudhouse also located nearby on Liddel (It is a mistake to suppose they settled in Debatable lands on the lower Liddel though at Riccarton, and Hudhouse they were on the upper end of the Liddel Water.)[3]and the Grahams, who owned five towers in the Debatable Land. The Irvings, Olivers, Bells, Dicksons, and Littles were also present in varying numbers.[1]
In 1530, King James V took action against the lawless clans of the Debatable Lands and imprisoned the Lords Bothwell, Maxwell and Home,

Champion Hill Confederate order of battle

The following Confederate Army units[1] and commanders fought in the Battle of Champion Hill of the American Civil War. The Union order of battle is listed separately. Order of battle compiled from the army organization,[2] returns of casualties[3] and reports.[4]

Contents

1 Abbreviations used

1.1 Military rank
1.2 Other

2 Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana
3 See also
4 Notes
5 References

Abbreviations used[edit]
Military rank[edit]

LTG = Lieutenant General
MG = Major General
BG = Brigadier General
Col = Colonel
Ltc = Lieutenant Colonel
Maj = Major
Cpt = Captain
Lt = 1st Lieutenant

Other[edit]

w = wounded
k = killed
c = captured

Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana[edit]
LTG John C. Pemberton

Division
Brigade
Regiments and Others

Loring’s Division
     MG William W. Loring

1st Brigade

   BG Lloyd Tilghman (k)
   Col A. E. Reynolds

1st Confederate Infantry Battalion: Ltc G. H. Forney
6th Mississippi: Col R. Lowry
23rd Mississippi: Col J. M. Wells
26th Mississippi: Col A. E. Reynolds, Maj T. F. Parker
Company C, 14th Mississippi Artillery Battalion (4 guns): Lt J. Culbertson
Company D, 1st Mississippi Light Artillery (4 guns): Cpt J. L. Wofford
Company G, 1st Mississippi Light Artillery (6 guns): Cpt J. J. Cowan

2nd Brigade

   BG Abraham Buford

27th Alabama: Col J. Jackson
35th Alabama: Col Edward Goodwin
54th Alabama: Col Alpheus Baker (w)
55th Alabama: Col J. Snodgrass
9th Arkansas: Col I. L. Dunlop
3rd Kentucky (4 companies): Maj J. H. Bowman
7th Kentucky: Col E. Crossland
12th Louisiana: Col Thomas M. Scott
Companies A & C, Pointe Coupée Artillery (8 guns): Cpt A. Bouanchaud

3rd Brigade

   BG Winfield S. Featherston

3rd Mississippi: Col T. A. Mellon
22nd Mississippi: Col F. Schaller
31st Mississippi: Col J. A. Orr
33rd Mississippi: Col D. W. Hurst
1st Mississippi Sharpshooter Battalion: Maj W. A. Rayburn

Division
Brigade
Regiments and Others

Stevenson’s Division
     MG Carter L. Stevenson

Division Artillery

Maj Joseph W. Anderson (k)

Botetourt (Virginia) Artillery (2 guns): Cpt J. W. Johnston
Company A, 1st Mississippi Light Artillery (4 guns): Cpt S. J. Ridley (k), Cpt W. T. Ratliff

1st Brigade

   BG Seth M. Barton

40th Georgia: Ltc R. M. Young
41st Georgia: Col W. E. Curtiss
42nd Georgia: Col R. J. Henderson
43rd Georgia: Col S. Harris (k), Cpt M. M. Grantham
52nd Georgia: Col C
오피뷰

Roșia River (Latorița)

Roșia River

River

Countries
Romania

Counties
Vâlcea County

Source

 - location
Latoriţa Mountains

Mouth
Coșeana River

The Roșia River is a headwater of the Coșeana River in Romania.
References[edit]

Administrația Națională Apelor Române – Cadastrul Apelor – București
Institutul de Meteorologie și Hidrologie – Rîurile României – București, 1971
Trasee turistice – județul Vâlcea [1]

Maps[edit]

Harta Munții Lotrului [2]
Harta Munții Latoriței [3]

This article related to a river in Vâlcea County is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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1999 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships – Women’s 100 metre backstroke

Women’s 100 metre backstroke
at the 1999 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships

Venue
Sydney International Aquatic Centre

Dates
August 23, 1999 (heats &
semifinals)
August 24, 1999 (final)

Competitors
20 from 8 nations

Winning time
1:01.51

Medalists

 
Dyana Calub
   Australia

 
Mai Nakamura
   Japan

 
Barbara Bedford
   United States

← 1997
2002 →

1999 Pan Pacific
Swimming Championships
Sydney, Australia

Freestyle

50 m
 
men
 
women

100 m

men

women

200 m

men

women

400 m

men

women

800 m

women

1500 m

men

Backstroke

100 m

men

women

200 m

men

women

Breaststroke

100 m

men

women

200 m

men

women

Butterfly

100 m

men

women

200 m

men

women

Individual medley

200 m

men

women

400 m

men

women

Freestyle relay

4×100 m

men

women

4×200 m

men

women

Medley relay

4×100 m

men

women

The women’s 100 metre backstroke competition at the 1999 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships took place on August 23–24 at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre.[1] The last champion was Mai Nakamura of Japan.[2]
This race consisted of two lengths of the pool, all in backstroke.[3]

Contents

1 Records
2 Results

2.1 Heats
2.2 Semifinals
2.3 Final

3 References

Records[edit]
Prior to this competition, the existing world and Pan Pacific records were as follows:

World record
 He Cihong (CHN)
1:00.16
Rome, Italy
September 10, 1994

Pan Pacific Championships record
 Janie Wagstaff (USA)
1:01.00
Edmonton, Canada
August 22, 1991

Results[edit]
All times are in minutes and seconds.

KEY:
q
Fastest non-qualifiers
Q
Qualified
CR
Championships record
NR
National record
PB
Personal best
SB
Seasonal best

Heats[edit]
The first round was held on August 23.[1]

Rank
Name
Nationality
Time
Notes

1
Noriko Inada
 Japan
1:02.14
Q

2
Mai Nakamura
 Japan
1:02.49
Q

3
Barbara Bedford
 United States
1:02.57
Q

4
Erin Gammel
 Canada
1:02.85
Q

5
Dyana Calub
 Australia
1:03.18
Q

6
Elli Overton
 Australia
1:03.19
Q

7
Miki Nakao
 Japan
1:03.24
Q

8
Kelly Stefanyshyn
 Canada
1:03.60
Q

9
Charlene Wittstock
 South Africa
1:03.72
Q

10
Giaan Rooney
 Australia
1:03.73
Q

11
Danielle Lewis
 Australia
1:03.77
Q

12
Lia Oberstar
 United States
1:03.95
Q

13
Choi Soo-min
 South Korea
1:04.20
Q

14
Nikki Tann
밤전

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. australis

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. australis

Conservation status

Vulnerable (EPBC Act)

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Plantae

(unranked):
Angiosperms

(unranked):
Eudicots

(unranked):
Rosids

Order:
Myrtales

Family:
Myrtaceae

Genus:
Verticordia

Species:
V. fimbrilepis

Subspecies:
V. f. subsp. australis

Trinomial name

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. australis
A.S.George[1]

Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. australis, commonly known as southern shy featherflower is a flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a slender shrub with one openly branched main stem at its base, small, pointed leaves and rounded groups of pink flowers near the ends of the branches.

Contents

1 Description
2 Taxonomy and naming
3 Distribution and habitat
4 Conservation
5 Use in horticulture
6 References

Description[edit]
Verticordia fimbrilepis subsp. australis is a slender shrub which grows to a height of about 40 cm (20 in) and which has one openly branched stem at its base. The leaves lower on the stems are linear in shape, almost round in cross-section, 2–5 mm (0.08–0.2 in) long with a rounded end with a sharp point. Those near the flowers are more oblong to narrow egg-shaped.[2]
The flowers are arranged in open groups on stalks 5–15 mm (0.2–0.6 in) long near the ends of the branches. The floral cup is broadly top-shaped, about 1.5 mm (0.06 in) long, glabrous but slightly rough. The sepals are bright mauve-pink 3–3.5 mm (0.12–0.14 in) long, with 5 to 7 hairy lobes. The petals are the same colour as the sepals, sometimes with a white base and are about 2.5–3.0 mm (0.098–0.12 in) long, 1.0 mm (0.04 in) or less wide, egg-shaped with long, coarse hairs. The staminodes have a broad stalk and a hairy fringe, lacking the single long hair in their centre of subspecies fimbrilepis. The style is 0.2–0.4 mm (0.008–0.02 in) long, straight and glabrous. Flowering time is from October to December.[2]
Taxonomy and naming[edit]
Verticordia fimbrilepis was first formally described by Nikolai Turczaninow in 1847 and the description was published in the Bulletin de la Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou. In 1991, Alex George undertook a review of the genus Verticordia and described two subspecies of V. fimbrilepis including this one. The type collection was made near the
BJ모음

Fagnano

Fagnano may refer to

Fagnano Alto, a comune in Abruzzo, Italy
Fagnano Castello, a comune in Calabria, Italy
Fagnano Olona, a comune in Lombardy, Italy
Lake Fagnano, in Tierra del Fuego, South America

People with the surname[edit]

Giulio Carlo de’ Toschi di Fagnano (1682–1766), Italian nobleman and mathematician
Giovanni Fagnano (1715–1797), Italian churchman and mathematician, Giulio’s son

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Fagnano.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Hans Weinberger

Hans F. Weinberger (September 27, 1928 in Vienna)[1] is an Austrian-American mathematician, known for his contributions to variational methods for eigenvalue problems, partial differential equations, and fluid dynamics.
He obtained an M.S. in physics from Carnegie Institute of Technology (1948) where he also got his Sc.D. on the thesis Fourier Transforms of Moebius Series advised by Richard Duffin (1950).[2] He then worked at the institute for Fluid Dynamics at University of Maryland, College Park (1950–60), and as professor at University of Minnesota (1961–98) where he was department head (1967–69) and now is Professor Emeritus (1998–). Weinberger was the first director of Institute for Mathematics and its Applications (1981–87).
In 2012 he became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society.[3]

Contents

1 Selected articles
2 Books
3 See also
4 References

Selected articles[edit]

“An inequality with alternating signs”. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 38 (7): 611–613. 1952. doi:10.1073/pnas.38.7.611. PMC 1063623. PMID 16589155. 
with J. B. Diaz: “Error estimation in the Weinstein method for eigenvalues”. Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 3 (4): 643–646. 1952. doi:10.1090/s0002-9939-1952-0050177-5. MR 0050177. 
“A solution of the singular initial value problem for the Euler-Poisson-Darboux equation”. Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 4 (5): 703–715. 1953. doi:10.1090/s0002-9939-1953-0058099-1. MR 0058099. 
“Error bounds in the Rayleigh-Ritz approximation of eigenvectors” (PDF). Nat. Bureau of Standards J. of Research. 64B: 216–225. 1960. doi:10.6028/jres.064b.023. 
“On bounding harmonic functions by linear interpolation”. Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 70 (4): 525–529. 1964. doi:10.1090/s0002-9904-1964-11183-6. MR 0162953. 
with M. H. Protter: “On the spectrum of general second order operators”. Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 72 (2): 251–255. 1966. doi:10.1090/s0002-9904-1966-11485-4. MR 0190527. 

Books[edit]

A First Course in Partial Differential Equations (Dover, 1995)
Maximum Principles in Differential Equations (Prentice-Hall, 1967; Springer, 1985). With Murray H. Protter.
Variational Methods for Eigenvalue Approximation, C.B.M.S. Regional Conference Series in Applied Mathematics #15, S.I.A.M., Philadelphia, 1974.

See also[edit]

Davis–Kahan–Weinberger dilation theorem

References[edit]

^ homepage
^ Hans Weinberger at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
^ List of Fellows of the American Mathematical

List of wars involving Nigeria

Part of a series on the

History of Nigeria

Timeline

Prehistory

Early history
pre-1500

Pre-colonial period
1500–1800

British period
1800–1960

First Republic
1960–1979

Civil War
1967–1970

Second Republic
1979–1983

Third Republic
1993–1999

Fourth Republic
1999–present

See also

History of the Igbo people
History of the Yoruba people

Nigeria portal

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This is a list of wars and conflicts in Nigeria.

Conflict
Combatant 1
Combatant 2
Results

Congo Crisis
(1960–1964)
Congo
UNOC
 Katanga
 South Kasai
Victory

Katanga and South Kasai dissolved.

Nigerian Civil War
(1967–1970)
 Nigeria
 Egypt
 Biafra
Victory

Reincorporation of Biafra into Nigeria.

First Liberian Civil War
(1990–1997)
 Liberia
ULIMO
ECOMOG
NPFL
INPFL
Indecisive (ECOMOG mission successful)[1]

Elections held, Charles Taylor becomes President.

Sierra Leone Civil War
(1993–2002)
Sierra Leone
ECOMOG
 United Kingdom
UNAMSIL
RUF
NPFL
AFRC
Victory

Lomé Peace Accord
Defeat of the Revolutionary United Front.

Conflict in the Niger Delta
(2004–)
 Nigeria
MEND
NDPVF
NDLF
Ongoing

Amnesty agreement in 2009

Boko Haram insurgency
(2009–)
 Nigeria
 Cameroon
 Chad
 Niger
Boko Haram
Ansaru
Ongoing

Introduction of sharia law in 9 states.

Northern Mali War
(2013)
 Mali
 France
ECOWAS
Islamists
Withdrawal

Nigerian withdrawal due to insurgency at home.[2]

Invasion of the Gambia
(2017)
 Senegal
 Nigeria
 Ghana
 Mali
 Togo
Coalition 2016
 Gambia
MFDC
Victory

Yahya Jammeh steps down peacefully, minimal combat between the two sides.

See also[edit]

Insurgency in the Maghreb (2002–present)

References[edit]

^ “The Ecomog Experience with Peacekeeping in West Africa – Whither Peacekeeping in Africa? – Monograph No 36, 1999.” Accessed January 29, 2016.

Despite the often discouraging prospects, the ECOMOG operation was ultimately successful for several reasons. The first was the sheer political will and tenacity of ECOWAS. The organisation did not have the option of cutting and running, for reasons that were as much self-interested as humanitarian. The second was the ability to combine three phases of conflict resolution: peacekeeping, peacemaking, and peace enforcement, thereby changing mandates of forces in the field as developments on the ground required (a flexibility due, ironic