Knut Glomsaas

comprar zero nicotine patch sin receta This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (June 2009)

acquistare chloroquine Knut Glomsaas

acquistare casodex Knut Markus Hansen Glomsaas (1863–1935) was a Norwegian military musician based in Trondheim. Although he decided to go to America as a 17-year-old man, his father saw his talents and made him join the military as a cornetist in the artillery instead.[1] He studied in Berlin for two years. He was known for his competence, and led and instructed multiple choirs. He wrote music for ballet, marches and military music, dance music,[1][2] and he wrote a polka for Trondheim’s 900-years jubilee.
The street Knut Glomsaas vei in Trondheim is named after him.
Sources[edit]

comprar lexapro sin receta ^ a b Brissach, Ingrid J. (18 March 2008). “Trondhjems store divisjonsmusiker”. Adresseavisen (in Norwegian). Trondheim: Adresseavisen AS. Retrieved 25 May 2009. 
^ “Knut Glomsaas”. Cappelens musikkleksikon (in Norwegian). J.W. Cappelens Forlag. ISBN 82-02-03686-0. 

compra xalatan This article about a Norwegian musician is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

acheter arimidex v
t
e

acheter orlistat 부산오피

Lesser pygmy flying squirrel

acquistare provacyl Lesser pygmy flying squirrel

compra premarin Conservation status

comprar chloromycetin sin receta Data Deficient (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Chordata

Class:
Mammalia

Order:
Rodentia

Family:
Sciuridae

Genus:
Petaurillus

Species:
P. emiliae

Binomial name

Petaurillus emiliae
Thomas, 1908

The lesser pygmy flying squirrel (Petaurillus emiliae) is a species of rodent in the family Sciuridae. It is endemic to Malaysia.
It is listed as Data Deficient because it is known only from the type specimen collected in 1901. Adequate surveys have not been done to look for this species, and so it cannot be considered Extinct.
The lesser pygmy flying squirrel is arboreal and probably prefers forest. It is threatened by habitat conversion due to agriculture and logging. There are no conservation measures in place. Further studies are needed into the taxonomy, distribution, abundance, reproduction and ecology of this species.
References[edit]

^ Duckworth, J. W. & Francis, C. (2008). “Petaurillus emiliae”. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 6 January 2009. 

External links[edit]

http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/16714/0

v
t
e

Extant species of family Sciuridae (subfamily Sciurinae, Pteromyini (Flying squirrels) tribe)

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Suborder: Sciuromorpha

Eoglaucomys

Kashmir flying squirrel (Eoglaucomys fimbriatus)

Glaucomys
(New World flying squirrels)

Southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans)
Northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus)

Hylopetes

Particolored flying squirrel (Hylopetes alboniger)
Afghan flying squirrel (Hylopetes baberi)
Bartel’s flying squirrel (Hylopetes bartelsi)
Gray-cheeked flying squirrel (Hylopetes lepidus)
Palawan flying squirrel (Hylopetes nigripes)
Indochinese flying squirrel (Hylopetes phayrei)
Jentink’s flying squirrel (Hylopetes platyurus)
Sipora flying squirrel (Hylopetes sipora)
Red-cheeked flying squirrel (Hylopetes spadiceus)
Sumatran flying squirrel (Hylopetes winstoni)

Iomys

Javanese flying squirrel (Iomys horsfieldi)
Mentawi flying squirrel (Iomys sipora)

Petaurillus
(Pygmy flying squirrels)

Lesser pygmy flying squirrel (Petaurillus emiliae)
Hose’s pygmy flying squirrel (Petaurillus hosei)
Selangor pygmy flying squirrel (Petaurillus kinlochii)

Petinomys

Basilan flyi
오피와우

Judith Phillips

Judith Eleri Phillips OBE (born 7 February 1959) has been Professor of Gerontology and Social Work at Swansea University since 2004.[1]
She was educated at Pontypridd Girls’ Grammar School, Aberystwyth University (BA, 1980), Jesus College, Oxford (MSc, 1983) and the University of East Anglia (PhD, 1989).[2] She was a Lecturer in Social Work at the University of East Anglia from 1989 to 1993, and Professor of Social Gerontology at Keele University from 2001 to 2004. She has been Scientific Director of the Centre for Innovative Ageing and Director of the Research Institute for Applied Social Science at Swansea University since 2009.
She was made an OBE in 2013.
References[edit]

^ “Professor Judith Phillips”. Swansea University. Retrieved 29 November 2014. 
^ ‘PHILLIPS, Prof. Judith Eleri’, Who’s Who 2015, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2015

수원오피

Avensa Flight 358

This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Spanish. (January 2017) Click [show] for important translation instructions. 

Do not translate text that appears unreliable or low-quality. If possible, verify the text with references provided in the foreign-language article.
After translating, {{Translated|ES|Vuelo 358 de Avensa}} must be added to the talk page to ensure copyright compliance.
For more guidance, see Wikipedia:Translation.

This article relies largely or entirely upon a single source. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. (November 2016)

Avensa Flight 358

An AVENSA DC-9, similar to the aircraft involved in the accident

summary

Date
22 December 1974

Summary
engine failure

Site
Near Maturin, Venezuela

Passengers
69

Crew
6

Fatalities
75

Survivors
0

Aircraft type
McDonnell Douglas DC-9-14

Operator
AVENSA

Registration
YV-C-AVM

Flight origin
Maturín Airport, Venezuela

Destination
Simón Bolívar International Airport, Venezuela

Avensa Flight 358 was a scheduled airline flight from Maturín Airport to Simón Bolívar International Airport in Venezuela. On 22 December 1974, the McDonnell Douglas DC-9, with 69 passengers and 6 crew on board, took off on runway 05 from Maturín Airport.[1] Five minutes after takeoff both engines shut down.[1] The pilots lost control of the aircraft and crashed 32 km (20 mi) from the city of Maturín, Venezuela.[1] All 75 on board the flight perished.[1][2]
Cause[edit]
The cause for the engine failure and loss of control was not determined.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b c d e ASN Aircraft accident, Sunday 22 December 1974, Retrieved 21 September 2013
^ tiempo, Volar en Venezuela.Com Portal de Aviación Civil de Venezuela, Aviones, Información, Equipos, Talleres, Estado del. “Resumen de Accidentes Aéreos en Venezuela – Resumen de accidentes aér – Aviones”. www.volarenvenezuela.com. Retrieved 2017-01-09. 

v
t
e

← 1973
Aviation accidents and incidents in 1974 (1974)
1975 →

Jan 6  Air East crash
Jan 24  Togo crash
Jan 26  Turkish Airlines Flight 301
Jan 30  Pan Am Flight 806
Feb 22  Delta Airlines Flight 523
Mar 3  Turkish Airlines Flight 981
Apr 18  Court Line Flight 95
Apr 22  Pan Am Flight 812
Jul 23  British Airways bombing attempt
Aug
오피와우

Dejan Trajkovski

Dejan Trajkovski

Personal information

Full name
Dejan Trajkovski[1]

Date of birth
(1992-04-14) 14 April 1992 (age 24)[1]

Place of birth
Maribor, Slovenia

Height
1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)[1]

Playing position
Left back

Club information

Current team

FC Twente

Number
6

Youth career

–2002
Kovinar Maribor[1]

2002–2011
Maribor

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2011–2014
Maribor
35
(0)

2015–2017
Domžale
44
(1)

2016–2017
→ FC Twente (loan)
12
(0)

2017–
FC Twente
0
(0)

National team‡

2011–2013
Slovenia U20
5
(0)

2011–2014
Slovenia U21
18
(0)

2016–
Slovenia
1
(0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15 January 2017.

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 12 November 2016

Dejan Trajkovski (born 14 April 1992[1]) is a Slovenian football defender who plays for FC Twente.

Contents

1 International career
2 Personal life
3 Honours
4 References
5 External links

International career[edit]
Trajkovski got his first call up to the senior Slovenia squad for the UEFA Euro 2016 qualifier against San Marino in October 2015.[2] He debuted for the team one year later, on 11 November 2016 against Malta.[3]
Personal life[edit]
He has a twin brother named Tadej who is also a footballer, playing as a goalkeeper.[1]
Honours[edit]

Maribor

Slovenian Championship (3): 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14
Slovenian Cup (2): 2011–12, 2012–13
Slovenian Supercup (3): 2012, 2013, 2014

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f NK Maribor. “Dejan Trajkovski – osebni karton” [Dejan Trajkovski – personal card] (in Slovenian). NK Maribor official website. Archived from the original on 19 July 2014. Retrieved 26 April 2014. 
^ “San Marino 0–2 Slovenia”. BBC Sport. 12 October 2015. Retrieved 17 November 2015. 
^ “Prvenec Verbiča za pomembne tri točke” [First goal for Verbic for important three points] (in Slovenian). Football Association of Slovenia official website. 11 November 2016. Retrieved 12 November 2016. 

External links[edit]

NZS profile (Slovene)

v
t
e

FC Twente – current squad

1 Marsman
2 Ter Avest
3 Andersen
4 Katsikas
5 Thesker
6 Trajkovski
7 Ede
8 Assaidi
10 Celina
11 Seys
12 Hölscher
13 Hengelman
14 Yeboah
16  Drommel
17 Ünal
19 F. Jensen
20 Stevens
21 Ebecilio
22 Mokotjo (c)
23 Van der Heyden
2
일산오피

1988 Algerian Cup Final

1988 Algerian Cup Final

Event
1987–88 Algerian Cup

USK Alger
CR Belcourt

0
0

USK Alger won 5–4 on penalties

Date
June 23, 1988

Venue
Stade 5 Juillet 1962, Algiers

← 1987
1989 →

The 1988 Algerian Cup Final was the 26th final of the Algerian Cup. The final took place on June 23, 1988, at Stade 5 Juillet 1962 in Algiers. USK Alger beat CR Belcourt 5-4 on penalties to win their second Algerian Cup.
Pre-match[edit]
Details[edit]

USK Alger v CR Belcourt

June 23, 1988

USK Alger
0 – 0 (a.e.t)
CR Belcourt

Report
(French)

 
Penalties
 

5 – 4

Stade 5 Juillet 1962, Algiers

USK Alger

CR Belcourt

GK

Yacine Bentalaa

DF

Soumatia

DF

Bengana

DF

Bellemou

DF

Kourifa

MF

Mouaci

MF

Amirouche Lalili

MF

Fawzi Benkhalidi

MF

Nourine

MF

Salim Boutamine

FW

Tarek Hadj Adlane

Substitutes :

FW

Boualem Baaziz

Manager :

Djamel Keddou

GK

Boudjelti

DF

A. Dahmani

DF

Y. Meziane

DF

Amani

DF

Khodja

MF

Kohil

MF

N. Mekidéche

MF

Demdoum

MF

Hocine Yahi

FW

Neggazi

MF

N. Badache

Substitutes :


Zouati

MF

Kabrane

Manager :

Mohammed Boudjenoune

MATCH OFFICIALS

Assistant referees:

Fourth official:

MAN OF THE MATCH

(USM Alger)

MATCH RULES

90 minutes.
30 minutes of extra-time if necessary.
Penalty shootout if scores still level.
Seven named substitutes.
Maximum of three substitutions.

References[edit]

v
t
e

USM Alger matches

Ligue 1 Finals

1963
1998

Algerian Cup Finals

1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1978
1980
1981
1988
1997
1999
2001
2003
2004
2006
2007
2013

Algerian Super Cup

1981
2013
2014
2016

Arab Club Cup Finals

2013

CAF Champions League finals

2015

Other Matches

USM Alger 11–0 ASM Oran (1975)
JS Kabylie vs USM Alger (2014)

v
t
e

Algerian Cup

Seasons

1962-63
1963-64
1964-65
1965-66
1966-67
1967-68
1968-69
1969-70
1970-71
1971-72
1972-73
1973-74
1974-75
1975-76
1976-77
1977-78
1978-79
1979-80
1980-81
1981-82
1982-83
1983-84
1984-85
1985-86
1986-87
1987-88
1988-89
1989-90
1990-91
1991-92
1992-93
1993-94
1994-95
1995-96
1996-97
1997-98
1998-99
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014
BJ야동

My Sweet Little Village

My Sweet Little Village / Vesničko má středisková

Original film poster (left: János Bán, Marián Labuda)

Directed by
Jiří Menzel

Produced by
Zbyněk Hloch

Written by
Zdeněk Svěrák

Starring
János Bán
Marián Labuda
Rudolf Hrušínský
Petr Čepek
Libuše Šafránková
Jan Hartl
Rudolf Hrušínský jr.

Music by
Jiří Šust

Cinematography
Jaromír Šofr

Edited by
Jiří Brožek

Distributed by
Ústřední půjčovna filmů

Release date

1985 (1985)

Running time

98 minutes

Country
Czechoslovakia

Language
Czech

My Sweet Little Village (Czech: Vesničko má středisková) is a 1985 Czechoslovak film directed by Jiří Menzel. In 1987 it was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.[1] At the 1986 Montreal World Film Festival, it won the Special Jury Award and Prize of the Ecumenical Jury. At the Paris Film Festival in 1987 Hungarian actor János Bán received the best actor award. In a public survey conducted in January 2007 by the online news server Novinky.cz this movie was chosen by 22,4% of voters (approximately 66,000 people) as the most popular Czech comedy in history.[2]

Contents

1 Plot
2 Cast
3 Reception
4 See also
5 References
6 External links

Plot[edit]
The film’s main storyline follows the life of Otík, a mentally retarded young man, in a tight-knit village community. The sweet-tempered Otík works as an assistant truck driver with Mr. Pávek, his older colleague and practical-minded neighbor. Pávek’s family takes care of Otík, whose parents are dead. However, the two coworkers become at odds over Otík’s inability to perform even the simplest tasks. Pávek demands that Otík be transferred to assist another driver, who happens to be a choleric and suspicious man named Turek (Turk in Czech). Rather than work with Turek, Otík decides to accept an offer of employment in Prague, but finds he does not fit into the city life. After discovering that the transfer of Otík to Prague was a trick by a crooked politician to get a deal on Otík’s large inherited house, Pávek agrees to give Otík a second chance and retrieves him from the city to resume their work together.
The film also follows several subplots, such as, the secret romance of Turek’s wife with a young vet, the tribulations of an accident-prone but respected doctor who has almost as much trouble with his pessimistic patients as he does with his car, and the desperate deeds of Pávek’s teenage son, who
분당오피

Level junction

Not to be confused with Level crossing.

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Flat junction: trains have to wait to cross the ‘diamond’ at the center

A schematic diagram of a dual-gauge diamond crossing

Several diamond crossings (now obsolete after removal of one track direction) in the Port of Mainz, Germany

A fully assembled level junction used where the Union Pacific and Kansas & Oklahoma tracks cross

A level junction (or in the United Kingdom a flat crossing) is a railway junction that has a track configuration in which merging or crossing railroad lines provide track connections with each other that require trains to cross over in front of opposing traffic at grade (i.e. on the level).
The cross-over structure is sometimes called a diamond junction or diamond crossing in reference to the diamond-shaped center. The two tracks need not necessarily be of the same gauge. A diamond crossing is also used as a component of a double junction, like the one illustrated on the right.
The opposite of a level junction is a flying junction, where individual tracks rise or fall to pass over or under other tracks.

Contents

1 Risks
2 Examples

2.1 Local transport
2.2 Different gauges

3 Drawbridge crossing
4 References
5 External links

Risks[edit]
Conflicting routes must be controlled by interlocked signals to prevent collisions.
Level junctions, particularly those of fine angles or near right angles, create derailment risks and impose speed restrictions. The former can occur as the flanges of the wheels are momentarily unsupported and unguided and can slip through the gaps in the rails, and the latter because the assembly contains elements that can break or vibrate loose.
Level junctions are considered a maintenance issue by railroad companies as the inherent gaps tend to be hard on locomotive and rolling stock wheelsets. Switched diamonds partially solve these problems, but introduce new ones.
Examples[edit]
Flat crossings are particularly common in the United States where the lines of one company cross the lines of another company, and there is no particular need for the lines to be connected for through traffic.
Three examples of two tracks crossing another two tracks:

At Rochelle Railroad Park in the United States, th
부천오피

Panzer VII Löwe

Panzerkampfwagen VII Löwe

Type
Super-heavy tank

Place of origin
Germany

Specifications

Weight

76 t (84 short tons) (Leichter Löwe)
90 t (99 short tons) (Schwerer Löwe)

Crew
5

Armor

100 mm (3.9 in) (Leichter Löwe)
120 mm (4.7 in) (Schwerer Löwe before redesign)
140 mm (5.5 in) (Schwerer Löwe after redesign)

Main
armament

105 mm (4.1 in) L/70 gun (Leichter Löwe and Schwerer Löwe before redesign)
88 mm (3.5 in) L/71 gun (Schwerer Löwe after redesign)

Secondary
armament

1 × coaxial machine gun

Speed

27 km/h (17 mph) (Leichter Löwe)
23 km/h (14 mph) (Schwerer Löwe before redesign)
35 km/h (22 mph) (Schwerer Löwe after redesign)

The Panzerkampfwagen VII Löwe (Lion) was a design for a super-heavy tank created by Krupp for the German government during World War II. The project, initially code-named VK 70.01 (K), never left the drawing board, and was dropped in 5–6 March 1942 in favor of Porsche’s heavier Panzer VIII Maus.[1]

Contents

1 Variants
2 See also
3 References

3.1 Citations
3.2 Web sources

Variants[edit]
The Löwe was designed in two variants (both had crew of five[1]):

Leichter Löwe
It was to weigh 76 tonnes, had 100 millimeters of frontal armor, a rear-mounted turret, a 105 mm L/70 high velocity gun, and a coaxial machine gun, while still managing a top speed 27 km/h. It was later cancelled by Adolf Hitler.[1]
Schwerer Löwe
It was to weigh 90 tonnes, had 120 mm frontal armor, a center-mounted turret, a 105 mm L/70 high velocity gun, and a coaxial machine gun, while still managing a top speed 23 km/h. After redesign it had 140 mm frontal armor, 88 mm KwK L/71 gun, top speed 35 km/h.[1]

See also[edit]

Tiger I, a vehicle that it was designed to replace
Tiger II, another vehicle it would have replaced
P. 1000 Ratte, a similar German super-heavy tank
P. 1500 Monster, another similar German super-heavy tank

References[edit]
Citations[edit]

^ a b c d Achtung Panzer (1996)

Web sources[edit]

“Panzerkampfwagen VII Löwe (Lion)”. Achtung Panzer. 1996. 

v
t
e

German armoured fighting vehicles of World War II

Tanks

Panzer I
Panzer II
Panzer III
Panzer IV
Panther
Tiger I
Tiger II
Panzer 35(t)
Panzer 38(t)

Self-propelled artillery

Wespe
10.5cm leFH18(Sf) LrS
10.5cm leFH18(Sf) 39H
15cm sFH13/1 (Sf) LrS
Sturmpan
분당오피

St. Anthony’s Hospital (St. Petersburg, Florida)

For other uses, see St. Anthony’s Hospital (disambiguation).

This article needs more links to other articles to help integrate it into the encyclopedia. Please help improve this article by adding links that are relevant to the context within the existing text. (May 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

St. Anthony’s Hospital

Geography

Location
1200 7th Ave. N., St. Petersburg, Florida, United States

Services

Beds
395[1]

History

Founded
1931[2]

Links

Website
stanthonys.com

Lists
Hospitals in Florida

St. Anthony’s Hospital is a hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida.
References[edit]

^ http://www.stanthonys.com/body.cfm?id=1080 Retrieved 7/10/2010 9:38PM-GMT
^ http://www.stanthonys.com/body.cfm?id=141 Retrieved 7/10/2010 9:40PM-GMT

External links[edit]

Official Website

Coordinates: 27°46′42″N 82°38′52″W / 27.7784492°N 82.647669°W / 27.7784492; -82.647669

This article relating to a hospital in Florida is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

한국야동